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First Time Buyer Mortgages
New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: The Home Buying Guide

The following information has been designed to help you with the regular process of property buying.

Whatever your circumstances, the following guide to house purchasing includes tips on:


HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: How much can I borrow?
The first thing you need to consider when buying a property is how much you can borrow. Using traditional income multiples, this can amount to around 3.5 x a single salary (or can be less), or – if you are buying with someone else – up to 3.5 x joint salaries.

However, some specialist mortgages will now allow you to borrow more than this. An increasing number of lenders are now also ditching income multiples in favour of 'affordability criteria'. This takes into account all your usual monthly expenses and assesses whether what remains is enough to support your mortgage repayments.

Although FirstRungNow remains strictly independent, we have teamed up with Estate Angels, who, as independent financial advisors can find the best first time buyer mortgage for you. They will let you know how much you can borrow, which is the best mortgage and how much it will cost.

You can see the variety of mortgages that have been designed to help you buy your first home in our best first time buyer mortgage table.

If you are buying alone but want to rent out a room in your property to help with the cost of the mortgage, the first £4,250 you receive in rental payments is exempt from tax. Visit HM Revenue and Customs (formerly the Inland Revenue) for full details. This income can even be factored into your affordability when considering how much you can borrow.

 

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HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: Legal costs
To get a clearer idea about the legal costs involved in the home-buying process contact our lawyers, Click Conveyancing. This firm specialises in first-time buyers and key workers (such as teachers and the police) and will answer your questions free of charge. Click here to make contact.

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HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: The Rent a Room scheme
If you decide to rent out a room in your property to a lodger, the first £4,250 you earn this way may be exempt from tax, which may make your mortgage more affordable. Visit the Direct Gov website for full details.

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HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: The property-buying process

HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: Estate agents and homefinders
The traditional way to find the property you want is to register with estate agents selling houses in the area where you want to buy. This will be free of charge, as the estate agent's fee is paid by the vendor, not the buyer.

You should visit in person so that the agents can get a feel for what you want. The details you will need to give will be: city or town, preferred area, number of bedrooms needed, bathrooms and reception rooms. They also need to know your maximum price and what type and style of property you prefer.

After discussing your requirements and expectations, they will send you details of relevant properties or phone you with the ones they think are especially suitable.

You can then view the properties you like by making an appointment with the estate agent. The agent may or may not accompany you to the viewing.

For the best results, stay in regular contact with your estate agent(s).

If you like a house that you view, the vendors may issue you with a Home Information Pack (HIP). This will become the law from 1st August 2007 for houses with 4+bedrooms, but some vendors are already choosing to use them. The HIP may include a basic survey and local searches related to the property, which has been compiled in advance.

Some owners now use online agents or websites to advertise the sale of their house, so keep a lookout here too.

Some people cut out the estate agent altogether and sell their home privately by advertising in local or national property newspapers, or the Internet. In these cases, contact the owner direct.

If you have very little free time to househunt, there are companies that will search for a property on your behalf and will even shortlist and view properties for you.

Before making an offer to buy a property, make sure you have considered the following:

  • Commuting times
  • Distance to mainline stations or motorways
  • The length of the chain you are buying into
  • The structural and decorative condition of the property
  • Any development or proposed development in the area
  • Businesses or schools nearby
  • Resaleability of the property, and so on.

When you have found a property you would like to buy, you make an offer ‘subject to contract’. If you have not already seen a survey in the HIP, it will also be 'subject to survey'.

Establish which fixtures and fittings are for sale, and be prepared to negotiate. (As a benchmark, fixtures and fittings are the things that, if you turned the house upside down and shook it, would not fall out.)

A Gifted Deposit is a new way of buying a new-build house, which obviates the need to find a deposit and can turn around the process in as little as four weeks.

Useful websites

www.naea.co.uk – the National Association of Estate Agents (industry body)
www.estatesforum.co.uk – a community website offering independent advice to homebuyers

Note: House buying and selling procedures are different in Scotland. When an offer has been accepted on a house, it becomes legally binding. This means the buyer cannot pull out at the last minute – a practice known as gazumping. In addition, most residential estate agency – except in some parts of Glasgow – is handled by solicitors, who have developed regional marketing co-operatives through Solicitors’ Property Centres. Several of these also provide advice on mortgages and other financial services.

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HELP FOR FIRST TIME BUYERS: First Time Buyer Mortgages
Next to death and divorce, purchasing a home has been described as one of the most stressful experiences you can undergo. One of the factors contributing to this is the arranging of mortgage finance in advance of finding a property and owning it. Most buyers will have to go through the complex world of mortgages, which includes a variety of lending offers, many of which are not as competitive as they may seem. It is therefore prudent to seek financial and mortgage advice at an early stage.

FirstRungNow is not authorised by the Financial Services Authority (FSA) under the Financial Services Act or Council of Mortgage Lenders under the Mortgage Code or any other regulated body. We are therefore unable to give any kind of formal advice. However, we have put together a generic guide for you as an outline of the areas for consideration and also listed some common terms used for information purposes.

To find out how much you could borrow or what the likely repayments and potential insurance premiums would be, click here.

Make sure you ask your mortgage broker what his advice wil cost you - it might be free or it could be several hundreds of pounds.

You can find out more about this type of mortgage in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Mortgage regulation – Since October 2004, mortgages have been regulated by the FSA. (Prior to this, they were only regulated on a voluntary basis under the Mortgage Code). The FSA now insists that certain regulatory commitments are met. This means that advisers are obliged to provide you with information on their status – for example if they are independent or tied – and the level of advice they are qualified to offer.

They must also disclose on what basis they will charge you, for example a percentage of the loan or an hourly fee. It may be that they do not charge at all, receiving their entire fee from the lender to which they introduce your business.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Deposit – A deposit is the amount of money that you will pay upfront towards the price of the house. The balance will be made up from mortgage finance. The size of deposit, which is calculated as a percentage of the total house price purchase, usually affects the interest rate you pay (see below).

Some lenders do offer 100 per cent mortgages, where no deposit is required but this will be dependent on your circumstances and may result in a higher interest rate. A more typical first-time buyer deposit would be between 5 and 10 per cent of the price of the property. For example, if you were required to provide a 10 per cent deposit and the purchase price was £150,000, you would need to put down a £15,000 deposit.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Income multiples – Some mortgage lenders will base how much they will lend you on a multiple of your gross annual salary, usually at 3.5-4 x salary, sometimes more, sometimes less (could differentiate between typical single and joint lending limits). An increasing number of lenders now look specifically at affordability when considering how much they will lend you, taking into account your regular monthly outgoings. Also, in the face of rising prices, more lenders are now gearing themselves up to lend to groups of up to four or five people wanting to club together. They will typically lend multiples of the highest salary and take into account each of the other borrowers' incomes.

You can find out more about first time buyer mortgages in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Self certification – With many mortgage lenders, you will be required to prove how much you earn by supplying payslips, annual accounts etc. Some schemes allow you to ‘self certify’ your income. This type of arrangement may be appropriate for the self-employed who may have erratic income or complicated arrangements. Whatever scheme you choose, it is imperative that you are comfortable with the monthly commitment of the mortgage as the home you purchase will be at risk of repossession by the lender if you do not keep up to date with your repayments.

You can find out more about first time buyer mortgages in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Repayment methods – The way in which you choose to repay your mortgage and the type of interest rate you select depend on personal circumstances and this is where a qualified adviser will be able to help. How the monthly repayment to the lender is organised will depend on the type of repayment method selected.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Repayment mortgage – With this method, you agree a term over which the mortgage should be repaid – typically 25 years. Then you make repayments to the lender on a monthly basis, consisting of both 'capital' (the sum you initially borrowed) and 'interest' (which accrues on it from day one). Assuming the agreed repayments are maintained, the loan is guaranteed to be repaid at the end of the term.

In the early years these payments will be primarily made up of interest; As the loan progresses, the interest is charged on a steadily decreasing amount of capital and the proportions of interest and capital shift; and as you approach the end of the loan, your last payments will comprise mainly capital.

You can find out more about first time buyer mortgages in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Interest-only mortgage – With this method, only interest payments are made to the lender. The capital is saved month by month in a separate investment vehicle such as an endowment, pension or ISA. At the end of the loan term, provided there is sufficient funds to do so, the sum of this pot is used to pay off the interest in one go. In certain circumstances, such as lending on buy-to-let mortgages, the lender might be happy for no investment vehicle to be in place.

Some investment vehicles, such as endowments, have not performed well in recent years, leaving the borrower with a shortfall at the end of the mortgage term. It is therefore imperative that you seek independent professional advice if you are considering using an investment vehicle to repay your loan.

You can find out more about first time buyer mortgages in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Mortgage types and interest rates – An interest rate is literally, in percentage terms, the rate that will apply to your loan. Different loan types will attract different rates of interest, which will be priced in different ways. A professional adviser should be able to recommend a package that suits your circumstances but here is a brief outline of the types of loans that you might be offered.

  • First Time Buyer Variable-rate mortgage – The lender’s variable rate (often referred to as the 'standard variable rate' or SVR) fluctuates and will generally follow the direction of the Bank of England's monthly base-rate changes. However, sometimes this is not in equal proportion and it may not change at all.
  • First Time Buyer Discount mortgage – Many lenders offer a discount from their SVR. For example, if you were offered a 1 per cent discount off the lender's variable rate of 5 per cent, your rate would be 4 per cent. It is important to note that your rate will also have the potential to go up and down with the SVR. The period over which the discount is available will vary. It is standard practice among lenders to tie you into the mortgage for the same period as the discount applies and possibly beyond. The tie-in is the time during which you will have to pay a penalty if you redeem the loan. However, you can usually take the loan with you if you move house, as the vast majority of loans are now portable.
  • First Time Buyer Fixed-rate mortgage – A fixed-rate mortgage allows you to set your rate at a certain level for a given period of time. So regardless of whether the lender's rate changes up or down, your payments remain the same. Again, you will be tied in for as long as the fixed rate applies and possibly beyond.

  • First Time Buyer Capped-rate mortgage – A variation on the theme of the fixed rate above, is a capped rate. The ‘cap’ really means that there is an upper limit on the interest rate you will pay. If the lender's SVR rises above this limit, your rate will be unaffected, just as with the fixed rate. However, if the lender's rate falls below the level of your cap, then your rate will fall. Again, you will be tied in for as long as the capped rate applies and possibly beyond.
  • First Time Buyer Tracker-rate mortgage – Another type of interest rate is a tracker rate, which is occasionally linked to the lender's variable rate but most commonly linked to the Bank of England base rate. The tracker follows the Bank of England base rate with a discount or a premium (or even sometimes at the same rate as Bank of England base rate) for a period of time. In this instance, any reduction will be passed on in full, which is not always the case if your rate is linked to the SVR. Some trackers, but not all, come with tie-ins.

  • First Time Buyer Cashback mortgage – To attract your business, you may be offered a cash incentive or ‘cashback’, which is payable on completion of the loan. However, this type of mortgage may only be offered to you by linking it to the lender's SVR.

  • First Time Buyer Flexible mortgage – A flexible mortgage offers the facility to underpay or overpay or even take payment holidays. It also allows you to borrow lump sums back from your loan free of charge. There are no tie-ins with flexible loans, meaning you can redeem the mortgage at any time with no penalty. A true flexible mortgage will calculate your interest on a daily, not an annual, basis. This means that the reduction in interest payments that occurs as a result of reducing capital kicks in on the next day rather than at the end of the year, as was traditionally the standard procedure. Fully flexible loans are usually priced at a variable rate of interest, although some fixed and discounted options are now emerging onto the market.

  • First Time Buyer Offset mortgage – An offset mortgage takes a flexible mortgage one stage further and comes with all the flexible features described above but in addition offsets your savings – which must be transferred into an account with the lender – against the debt of your mortgage. For example, if you had £5,000 in savings and a mortgage of £100,000, you would only pay interest on the remaining balance of £95,000. The reduced interest you pay as a result of this arrangement means a shorter loan term. You will not receive interest payments on the credit balance of your savings but this means you will not pay tax on that interest either. Also, the interest you are forfeiting on your credit balance is nearly always lower than the rate you pay on debt balances. However, offset mortgages work most effectively if you have considerable savings – something that many first-time buyers might prefer to put towards a deposit. Interest rates on offsets can also be more expensive.
  • First Time Buyer Current account mortgage – A current account mortgage is also completely flexible and works along the same lines as an offset mortgage. The main difference is that all balances are thrown into one big pot rather than being kept in separate accounts. You are also able to incorporate credit cards and personal loans into the pot. So if you had a total debt – including your mortgage – of £130,000 and savings of £5,000 your balance at the ATM machine would read £125,000 overdrawn. But all debt is charged at cheaper mortgage rates and all credit is offset against this debt, further reducing its cost. Current account mortgages are usually aimed at sophisticated, astute borrowers who know how to use them for the best results.

You can find out more about first time buyer mortgages in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Higher lending charge (HLC) – This charge was once known as a Mortgage Indemnity Premium (MIP) or a Mortgage Indemnity Guarantee (MIG). Some lenders levy the fee on loans above a certain Loan to Value (LTV) – usually either 90 or 95 per cent. This mitigates the ‘high risk’ that the borrower poses. A HLC basically amounts to an insurance policy for the lender, for which you, as the borrower, pay the premium. The lender wants this insurance to cover itself against the cost of the borrower defaulting on the loan, having to repossess the property and then sell it on.HLCs have received a very bad press in recent years and have consequently been on the decrease but you should still be aware of them. Some lenders will soften the blow by letting you add the HLC to the loan but this works out to be even more costly in the long term.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Redemption penalty – This is what you will pay to redeem your mortgage if you are still within the ‘tie-in’ period. Tie-ins vary in duration and usually apply to most loans that come with a cheap
initial rate. Redemption penalties are usually calculated as a percentage of the outstanding loan. A tiered redemption penalty is when the amount you pay to redeem reduces with each year of the tie-in.

Redeeming your mortgage is not to be confused with moving the loan to another property, as most schemes are portable and no penalty is levied. You should ask a qualified adviser to explain what, if any, penalties are payable if you wish to repay the loan. Redemption penalties can run into thousands of pounds so it is imperative you are aware of this at the outset.

First Time Buyer Mortgages: Conclusion – In conclusion to our mortgage guide, and to reiterate what was mentioned at the beginning of this section, you must give proper consideration to how you finance your mortgage. Prepare yourself and make sure you are in a position to ask the right questions of a qualified adviser. He or she will be able to help you choose the right mortgage for your particular circumstances and requirements.

If you have any questions about mortgages and would like to see how the cost of a joint mortgage would compare with your current situation, or you have any other query, click here to arrange an appointment with a mortgage adviser. He or she will be happy to answer any question you might have about mortgages or insurance – no matter how simple or complicated.

You can find out more about first time buyer mortgages in our Best First Time Buyer Mortgage table.

Useful websites

www.cml.org.uk – Council of Mortgage Lenders.

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Help for First Time Buyers: Stamp Duty and Land Tax
Stamp Duty and Land Tax is payable in different amounts via the conveyancing solicitor, depending on the purchase price of the house.

0-£125,000 0% payable
£125,001-£250,000 1% payable
£250,001-£500,000 3% payable
Above £500,000 4% payable

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Help for First Time Buyers : Protecting your investment

Help for First Time Buyers: Insurance
When you have bought your home, you will want to protect it by insuring the building against damage, such as that caused by flooding, fire or subsidence. In any case, the mortgage lender will insist on it.

It is also wise to protect your contents. You can often buy a combined buildings and contents insurance policy.

You may also need life insurance, critical illness cover or mortgage payment protection insurance (MPPI) in case you are made redundant or suffer a prolonged absence from work and are not able to meet your mortgage payments

If you are buying your home with someone else, you might want to take out life insurance. If one of you dies, this will pay off the mortgage or pay out a lump sum. Make certain that you have the right beneficiary appointed. You should be aware that the FSA now regulates general insurance business so don't be afraid to ask any insurance adviser or broker you see or talk to, whether independent or affiliated, to disclose their status. Ask them to fully explain your options and how they will make money from transacting your business.

If you have any questions about mortgages and would like to see how the cost of a joint mortgage would compare with your current situation, or you have any other query, click here to arrange an appointment with a mortgage adviser. He or she will be happy to answer any question you might have about mortgages or insurance – no matter how simple or complicated.

Useful websites

www.biba.org.uk – website of the British Insurance Brokers Association.
www.unbiased.co.uk – website run by IFAP, which promotes independent financial advisers.
www.sofa.org – website of the Personal Finance Association.

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Help for First Time Buyers: How to budget
As a first-time buyer it can be difficult to know where to begin in trying to work out how much money you have for the deposit and how much to spend on your monthly mortgage repayments. Your monthly outgoings as a homeowner will differ from those of a rent-payer, even if you take out a Shared Ownership Mortgage. So, what payment costs do you incur when you buy your first home and what kind of monthly outgoings do you need to budget for?

Before you begin your house-hunt in earnest, it is essential that you sit down and work out how much money you have for a deposit. This may not just be a question of the money you have saved towards the deposit so far, as you need to remember that you will have some one-off payments when buying your new home. These one-off payments will include:

  • Legal cover
  • Stamp duty
  • Evaluation searches
  • Solicitor's fee
  • Mortgage arrangement fees

And may also include any payments you may have to make on:

  • Furniture
  • Decoration costs
  • Yearly bills such as TV licence

The Home Information Pack from June 2007 will give an idea of household bills and council tax.

Once you have a clearer idea of how much money you have for your deposit you then need to calculate how much you will be able to afford to spend on your mortgage repayments each month. In order to do this you need to take into account your monthly outgoings – these will differ from the ones you may have at the moment and also if you move out of your current area into a new area, say from Yorkshire to London. Use the checklist below to remind you of all the monthly payments you might incur:

  • Bills (such as council tax, water, gas, electric, phone)
  • House insurance
  • Mortgage protection cover
  • Food money
  • Car/transport costs
  • Gym membership
  • Pension (if you have one)
  • Clothes
  • Money for socialising
  • Annual service charges
  • Grounds maintenance

Once you have calculated these monthly payments you will then have a better idea of how much you will be able to spend each month on your mortgage. You can then enter your deposit into an online mortgage calculator to give you an initial idea of how much you can afford to spend on the price of the house itself. This will help you when you speak to the mortgage adviser as more information helps them to find the best mortgage for you.

If you are a first-time buyer and would like advice from experienced staff who put your needs first and are always available to give you on-going first-time buyer advice, just click here to contact our mortgage partners EstateAngels.

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Help for First Time Buyers: Choosing expert help

Surveys
Unless you are putting a large deposit down on the property, your mortgage company or lender will probably carry out a survey for its own purposes. This is called a valuation and simply verifies that the property is adequate security for the lender’s loan.

For your own peace of mind, and perhaps as a bargaining tool, it’s therefore a good idea to commission your own survey. This can be either a Home Buyer’s Report or the more expensive full structural survey – although this usually only applies to older or unusual properties.

Having your own survey carried out will ensure you are aware of any problems such as damp, dry rot or subsidence. It will also highlight remedial work that needs doing, which can be factored into the price. A survey could even save you from buying an unsuitable property

The Home Information Pack introduced in June 2007 will include a Home Condition Report outlining any problem areas. It will also let you know the approximate utility bills and council tax.

Useful websites

www.rics.org.uk – industry body.

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Help for First Time Buyers: Solicitors and property lawyers

You will need to appoint a solicitor or property lawyer to deal with the conveyancing and legal formalities of the property transfer.

Some solicitors will charge their fee as a percentage of the value of the property and others as a fixed fee. Ask for quotes and seek personal recommendations. Some solicitors that specialise in conveyancing offer an online service.

Following the acceptance of a formal offer, the solicitor will make any pre-sale enquiries between you and the vendor and take you through the exchange and completion of the sale.

Before the point of exchange, your solicitor will carry out one or more ‘local searches’. You may want to supplement this search by researching what’s going on in the surrounding area yourself. For instance, you can ask the local planning department if any applications have been made to build new properties adjacent or relevant to your prospective purchase. You can also ask other people in the neighbourhood what it’s like to live there and what’s going on in the area.

Usually about a week prior to ‘moving in day’, normally known as the ‘completion date’, you will exchange contracts with the vendor. You will need the mortgage offer to be in place by the time contracts are exchanged.

At the point of completion, your name will be registered with the Land Registry and you will have to pay Stamp Duty Land Tax. The solicitor will arrange this for you. At this stage, you will also pay any telegraphic transfer fees for transferring money from one account to another

You should aim to move into the house on a date convenient for yourself, the vendor and any other parties in the chain above.

To ask about the legal aspects of purchasing a house, joint or shared ownership or to ask for a quote for legal services, click here.

Useful websites

www.sfla.org.uk
www.lawsociety.org.uk
www.solicitors-online.org.uk
www.landreg.gov.uk
www.conveyancer.org.uk
www.sspc.co.uk
www.espc.com

Note: The law and buying and selling procedures are different in Scotland, where the 'offers over' and 'fixed price' systems can be confusing. Generally speaking, solicitors become involved in the buying process at an earlier stage than in England and it is sensible to make contact with a solicitor before you start serious house-hunting. Making an offer in Scotland is a more formal step than in England and can lead to your making a legal commitment to buy at an earlier stage.

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Help for First Time Buyers: Removal companies
When you move into your new home, you might move all your possessions yourself, hire a 'man-with-a-van' or use a professional removals firm.

Ring around for quotes.

Find out whether your belongings are insured during packing and transit. You may prefer to take out your own third-party insurance rather than using the removal firm's insurance, as this can work out cheaper.

You may need to decide how many of your belongings you wish to pack yourself and how much you want the removers to pack. Bear in mind that many removal firms will not insure items that they have not packed themselves.

If you need to store your furniture for a while, think about self-storage as a cheaper option than paying the removals firm. Remember to check what insurance is required while your possessions are in storage.

Make sure you keep any removals company up to date with the moving-in date.

Make sure all pallets are labelled with their contents, and provide a room plan of your new property. Colour-code both plan and pallets so that the removal men can pack your belongings into the vehicle in the right order and unpack them again at your destination.

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Help for First Time Buyers: Utilities
You will need power, gas, water and phone, so find out from the estate agent which firms supply the services, so that you can make them aware that the meters need reading and that you will become responsible for those utilities from that date.

Useful websites

www.ofwat.gov.uk – regulatory body for water.
www.ofgem.gov.uk – regulatory body for the gas and electricity markets.
www.ofcom.org.uk – regulatory body for communications.

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Help for First Time Buyers: Tips for relieving the stress of moving!
Remember to keep out the kettle, milk and tea so you can brew up when you’ve moved in!

If you feel that you just cannot afford to buy your own home, read the rest of our website thoroughly. We can help you take that first step onto the property ladder now.

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General Useful Web-site (includes Scotland): www.shelter.org.uk/adviceonline

FirstRungNow offers information, news, advice and help for the aspiring first time buyer. We cover all types of help for first time buyers: First time buyer mortgages, first properties, shared ownership, joint ownership, shared equity, joint equity, rent to buy, buy to let and HomeBuy. All you could need - right here!


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FirstRungNow offers information for the first time buyer. We offer help for first time buyers and information on first time buyer mortgages.
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Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show



Click Conveyancing

New Property Bargains for First Time Buyers

Mortgage Advice for First Time Buyers

First Time Buyers Show